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Image courtesy of WinterE229/Wikimedia Commons.

A Canadian city is looking recoup millions of dollars it says a Husky Energy pipeline spill has cost it and its employees.

In a statement released on Wednesday the City of Prince Albert said it has begun the claim process seeking financial remuneration from Husky Energy.

The city said the spill has cost it “millions of dollars” but did not disclose further details about the costs or how much it is seeking.

The city said it’s seeking compensation for a “wide variety of costs” including the salaries of city workers and contractors and material costs for constructing two water pipelines as alternative water sources for the city.

The City of Prince Albert was forced to close its water treatment plant intake on July 25 after a Husky Energy pipeline released oil and dliutent into the North Saskatchewan River.

Husky Energy confirmed last month that the pipeline released between 200 to 250 cubic meter of fluid.

The company said on Tuesday that cleanup is “making steady progress.”

The city is looking to recoup worker wage costs tied to running of the city’s Emergency Operations Center and General Inquiry Center during the spill.

The city is also seeking to recoup lost wages for outdoor workers who were temporarily laid off when some civic facilities were shutdown for about three weeks following the spill.

The city said it has “committed to paying the salaries of 35 full and part-time lifeguard staff that were temporarily laid off” and will be seeking compensation from Husky Energy on behalf of its staff.

The City of Prince Albert has hired Deloitte to assist in the claims process with Husky Energy.

The city added that preliminary meetings with Husky Energy “have been positive.”

“The City is doing their part to make sure they are taken care of and we have no doubt that Husky will then reimburse us for the lost hours to our staff and facilities during the oil spill situation,” City of Prince Albert Mayor Greg Dionne said.