SHARE
Image courtesy of roy.luck/Wikipedia Commons.

An earthquake shook the home of the Cushing oil terminal in Oklahoma on Sunday evening, marking the nineteenth quake to strike the state in the last week.

According to data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a 5.0 magnitude earthquake occurred about 1.2 miles west of Cushing, Oklahoma at 7:44 p.m. on Sunday.

Pipeline operators in the area have not reported any damages or impacts tied to the quake as of Monday morning.

No damages or impacts at the Cushing oil terminal have been reported.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission’s Oil and Gas Division (OGCD) and the Oklahoma Geological Survey are currently evaluating potential impacts caused by the quake.

The agencies are continuing to assess infrastructure in the area.

According to NBC, Cushing Assistant City Manager Jeremy Frazier said that most of the damage was contained to Cushing’s downtown area.

Frazier added that only a few minor injuries were reported.

Cushing’s new fire station sustained significant damage from the quake, News On 6 said.

Sunday’s temblor was the nineteenth earthquake to strike Oklahoma in the last week, according to USGS data.

According to data collected by Tulsa World, the earthquake was the fifth strongest earthquake in Oklahoma’s history.

Earlier this year, the Oklahoma Corporation Commission moved to curb disposal well volumes in the central part of the state in hopes of reducing earthquake activity.

The OCC’s plan calls for total disposal volumes in central Oklahoma to be reduced by 40 percent compared to 2014 levels.

“This means a reduction of more than 300,000 barrels a day from the 2015 average injection volumes,” OGCD Baker director Tim Baker said in March.

State regulators also ordered several disposal wells to be shut down earlier this year in an effort to combat quakes in the area.

While hydraulic fracturing has not been shown to induce earthquake activity, the USGS believes that wastewater disposal tied to both conventional and unconventional wells is the primary cause of an uptick in earthquake activity in the central United States.